30 West Mission Street
Suite 2
Santa Barbara, CA 93101
(805) 201-2909
Fax (805) 201-2931
info@sbchiropractic.com
 

Give your Children a Head Start
Drs. Neal and Nicole Barry

No one has a completely straight spine, but nearly 3 out of every 100 people have what¹s known as scoliosis ­ an S-shaped curvature of the spine. Usually, this curvature is not detected on the routine spinal screenings performed at schools.  As the child grows, the curve generally gets worse, and can cause discomfort and problems with breathing and circulation. Scoliosis might be even more dangerous than originally thought. A study in the journal Spine found that children diagnosed with scoliosis had significantly lower bone mineral density (BMD) than healthy children.

These results were maintained over three years of follow-up measurements.

What’s this all mean? Basically, bone density is a good indicator of bone strength. The greater the bone density, the stronger your bones are. People with weak bones often suffer from osteoporosis, which can lead to painful falls and fractures. Researchers believe that osteoporosis is extremely uncommon in children, but these results suggest that children with scoliosis may be at risk.

Give your children a head start on health by making sure they have regular chiropractic exams, as they grow.  A chiropractic physical examination can help detect scoliosis and any other spinal abnormalities that may lead to spinal pain and greater problems later in life.

Reference:
Cheng JCY, Sher AHL. Persistent osteopenia in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Spine, June 15, 1999: Vol. 24, No.12, pp1218-1222.

Safe Sunscreen
With more of us wearing sunscreen than ever, lets explore the best and the rest- to keep us healthy!

In a new investigation of 1,104 name-brand sunscreens, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) found that 4 out of 5 sunscreen products offer inadequate protection from the sun, or contain ingredients with significant safety concerns. Leading brands were the worst offenders: None of market leader Coppertone's 48 sunscreen products met EWG's criteria for safety and effectiveness, and only 1 of 115 products from Banana Boat and Neutrogena, the second- and third-largest manufacturers, are recommended by EWG.

Many products on the market present obvious safety and effectiveness concerns, including one of every eight that does not protect from UVA radiation This problem is aggravated by the fact that FDA has not finalized comprehensive sunscreen safety standards they began drafting 30 years ago. Overall we identified 171 products that offer very good sun protection with ingredients that present minimal health risks to users.  Find out which in our best and worst lists.

More Americans than ever are using sunscreen to protect from sunburn and guard against skin cancer. Top choices include products with high SPF ratings, and that are waterproof or that advertise "broad spectrum" protection. Most people trust that the claims on the bottle will ensure that the product truly protects their health and their families'. Nothing could be less certain.

  • Only 15% of 1,104 products analyzed met EWG's criteria for safety and effectiveness, blocking both UVA and UVB radiation, remaining stable in sunlight, and containing few if any ingredients with significant known or suspected health hazards. Our assessment is based on a detailed review of hundreds of scientific studies, industry models of sunscreen efficacy, and toxicity and regulatory information housed in nearly 60 government, academic, and industry databases.


  • Many products lack UVA protection. Our analysis found that 7 percent of high SPF sunscreens (SPF of at least 30) protect only from sunburn (UVB radiation), and do not contain ingredient combinations known to protect from UVA, the sun rays linked to skin damage and aging, immune system problems, and potentially skin cancer. FDA does not require that sunscreens guard against UVA radiation.
  • Sunscreens break down in the sun. Paradoxically, many sunscreen ingredients break down in the sun, in a matter of minutes or hours, and then let UV radiation through to the skin. Our analyses show that 44% of products on the market contain ingredients that may be unstable alone or in combination, raising questions about whether these products last as long as the label says. FDA has not proposed requirements for sunscreen stability.
  • Questionable product claims are widespread. Many products on the market bear claims that are considered "unacceptable" or misleading under FDA's draft sunscreen safety standards. Claims like "all day protection," "mild as water," and "blocks all harmful rays" are not true, yet are found on bottles. Until FDA sets an effective date for these standards, industry is free to use hyped claims. Companies' decisions to inflate claims has spurred class action lawsuits in California.
  • Many sunscreens contain nano-scale ingredients that raise potential concerns. Micronized and nano-scale zinc oxide and titanium dioxide in sunscreen provide strong UVA protection, and are contained in many of our top-rated products. Repeated studies have found that these ingredients do not penetrate healthy skin, indicating that consumers' exposures would be minimal. Powder and spray sunscreens with nano-scale ingredients raise greater concerns, since particles might absorb more easily through the lungs than the skin. Studies of other nano-scale materials have raised concerns about their unique, toxic properties. FDA has failed to approve effective UVA filters available in Europe that, if approved here, could replace nano-scale ingredients.
  • The U.S. lags behind other countries when it comes to products that work and are safe. FDA has approved just 17 sunscreen chemicals for use in the U.S. At least 29 are approved for use in the E.U. FDA has approved only 4 chemicals effective in the UVA range for use in the U.S., and has failed to approve new, more effective UVA filters available in the E.U. and Asia.
  • Some sunscreens absorb into the blood and raise safety concerns. Our review of the technical literature shows that some sunscreen ingredients absorb into the blood, and some are linked to toxic effects. Some release skin-damaging free radicals in sunlight, some could disrupt hormone systems, several are strongly linked to allergic reactions, and others may build up in the body or the environment. FDA has not established rigorous safety standards for sunscreen ingredients that fully examines these effects.

After 30 years of debate,the government has failed to set mandatory sunscreen safety standards. Companies are free to make their own decisions on everything from advertising claims to product quality. FDA now stands in direct violation of a Congressional mandate requiring the agency to finalize sunscreen safety standards by May 2006, flouting not only Congress but also consumers, who are reliant on sunscreen to protect their health.

Adapted from an article found on www.cosmeticdatabase.com, by: Sean Gray, Senior Analyst; Sonya Lunder, MPH, Senior Analyst; Kristan Markey, Analyst (former); Rebecca Sutton, Ph.D., Staff Scientist; Nneka Leiba, MPH, Researcher; Jane Houlihan, Vice President for Research


In This Issue
Three Sure-Fire Strategies to Prevent Swine Flu
Stay Healthy this Summer: Food Safety Tips
Give Your Children a Head Start
Strawberry Spinach Salad

» Article Library


Sign Up

Sign up for our monthly newsletter and stay informed with the latest healthcare tips, recipes, and more!

Email:
We respect your privacy and will not share your e-mail address with anyone.

Newsletter Archives

  » August 16, 2011
  » October 27, 2010
  » July 21, 2010
  » January 20, 2010
  » August 31, 2009
  » May 22, 2009
  » March 18, 2009
  » December 10, 2008
  » October 22, 2008
  » September 17, 2008
  » August 29, 2008
  » June 25, 2008
  » May 14, 2008
  » April 23, 2008

» More  


Home | Meet Your Doctors | First Visit | Chiropractic FAQ | Newsletter | Community Links | Directions

©2009 Barry Family Chiropractic, All Rights Reserved
Site Designed by Jaimi Kercher Photography
Sidebar Photographs ©2009 Jaimi Kercher Photography